Wednesday, 29 June 2011

Putting the Bard in Bardou

This appeared on line this morning. I think it's a super record of a concert we gave a couple of weeks ago in Bardou, a very special nearby hill village, despite the producers thinking that rather than add subtitles to the spoken bits - in the introduction - they would have both languages, French and English, on the go simultaneously. Actually, if you latch on to the English, your ear may block out the French and you can probably follow it through. If you need to, of course.



Despite one or two infelicities of intonation and an acoustic like the inside of a bedroom slipper (very intimate and cosy, all the same), I was reasonably pleased. The first sung item, by Anton Bruckner, otherwise known for vast symphonies, is called Locus Iste a Deo Factus Est (This place was built by God). The second, Bogoroditsye Dyevo (a needlessly complicated way, it seems to me, of saying 'Hail, Mary') is a setting of the Russian Orthodox words by Arvo Pärt, an Estonian composer born in 1936, I think.) The third piece is my own setting of Shakespeare's Orpheus with his lute made trees And the mountain tops that freeze...bow before him.

And of course the village peacocks have their say, too. You can find the post from which the You Tube clip was taken here.

16 comments:

Mike and Ann said...

Thank you Christopher. Thoroughly enjoyed that. Shall replay it to Ann this evening, after we've eaten.

Rog said...

Wonderful singing Christopher, spoiled only by the French Catering bloke who comes in near the end and bats on about "Baguettes apres Cinq Heures".

Nice Peacocks though. Well done. Thursday's Children don't have far to go.

Z said...

That was lovely. Thank you.

Christopher said...

Thank you, Mike. I hope the second showing goes as well as the first.

The peacocks were especially for you, Rog.

We'll come and sing at your house at the drop of a feZ.

moreidlethoughts said...

Well, I couldn't sift the English from the intro, but I "got it."
Et le paon fait trembler son queue pour M. Camel House.
Bravo, les Jeudistes.

letouttoplay said...

The only spoken bit I caught was the baguettes I'm afraid but your lovely singers really did you proud.
I shall listen again now. Thank you.

Christopher said...

MIT: Thank you. I don't know why that peacock should have put on such a show - it's a courting display. I think this one must have been very easily confused. Perhaps it was the red shirts.

Mig: Thank you, too. Very pleased if you enjoyed it. ('Baguette' in this context meant conductor's baton.)

moreidlethoughts said...

Well done! This time, for guessing my cryptic metaphor. Yes, you posted the correct answer in my silly quiz.

Rosie said...

A real pleasure to watch.

Christopher said...

MIT: Thank you. I can sleep now.

Rosie: Thank you, too. Erm...it's a long shot, but I don't suppose Maureen could possibly have been in the audience? Quite an elegant lady (but could she have been wearing odd ankle socks?) with a couple of black twins of about 11 in tow?

Tim said...

Belatedly got round to watching/ hearing this. Very beautiful, and I disagree about the acoustic - swathes of reverb would have spoilt it. I envy you, because I can't write down the sounds I hear in my head.

Christopher said...

Thank you, Tim. An acoustic like that makes singing quite ungrateful, which I suppose is why some sing in the bathroom, on account of the flattering resonance. And it may be that standards of bathroom singing have declined with the current preference for showers. If you've any thoughts on the matter, perhaps you could get your PA to relay them to my chaps?

Tim said...

My downstairs loo has excellent small room reverberation. And it gets used more frequently than the bath or the shower. But I'm not often in there long enough to get through a full aria, even if I knew one.

Christopher said...

This is very interesting. I would like to know if your downstairs loo is a) equipped as a recording studio, b) licensed to sell alcoholic drinks and c) offers hostess service. Thank you.

Tim said...

Afraid not. a) and b) are available two rooms away; c) would have to be ordered in.

Dave said...

Sadly* there are no speakers attached to this library computer.

*Figure of speech used out of politeness.